News and Ideas

Update to CPD Portfolio Builder

I have made a minor change to the way you review your audit entries. It is now possible to review your entries from the last 12 months, from the 1st of January to date and from the 1st of the month to date.

Once you have done this, you will find a link to create an audit portfolio entry for the time period you have chosen. This means that the original link on the Audit page has now disappeared.

I hope this does not cause any confusion!


Standby CPD: Hypoglycaemia - it's no stroke!

Your patient this month appears to be having a stroke, but is actually hypoglycaemic and rather violent!

This issue will review the anatomy and physiology of blood glucose regulation and the disruption caused by diabetes mellitus. The common signs and symptoms will be reviewed, as well as the appropriate management, including when NOT to leave patients at home, even if they appear to have made a full recovery.

Visit standbycpd.com to find out more.


Standby CPD: Meningococcal Disease - a spot of bother

Very sick children do not come along that often, but when they do, you need to be at the top of your game.

This issue will explore the two presentations of meningococcal disease, meningitis and septicaemia, with explanation of the pathophysiology, the difficulties in spotting these children early on, and their appropriate management, depending on their presentation.

Visit standbycpd.com to find out more.





The HPC are coming...look busy!

It's audit time again and for the paramedics on the site, you should have received your renewal letters from the Health Professions Council. Once returned, a lucky(!) few will receive a further letter inviting them to submit a CPD profile.

If you are one of those, don't panic! Drop me a line and I'll give you some pointers on putting your profile together (although the HPC do stipulate that it has to be your own work, so I can't actually write it for you!).

The catch? You need to be using the CPD Portfolio Builder.


Standby CPD: Trauma - a clucking disaster!

This month, you attend an RTC on the motorway. Two lorries have collided and your patient is trapped in the cab of his jack-knifed lorry. He is obtunded and showing signs of haemorrhagic shock.

This issue will review the <C>ABC management of trauma and the step-wise approach to haemorrhage control, including wound packing, haemostatic agents and the use of tourniquets.

Visit standbycpd.com to find out more.


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